Tuesday, January 23, 2007

Blood and oil in the creeks

The new issue (February) of Vanity Fair has a monumental article on militants in the Niger Delta. Dammie, thanks for the heads up. Sebastian Junger paints a picture filled with colour, light, shade, pain, and anger:

On June 23, 2005, a group of high-ranking government officials were convened in a ballroom of the Four Seasons Hotel in Washington, D.C., to respond to a simulated crisis in the global oil supply. The event was called "Oil ShockWave," and it was organized by public-interest groups concerned with energy policy and national security. Among those seated beneath a wall-size map of the world were two former heads of the C.I.A., the president of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The scenario they were handed was this:

Civil conflict breaks out in northern Nigeria—an area rife with Islamic militancy and religious violence—and the Nigerian Army is forced to intervene. The situation deteriorates, and international oil companies decide to end operations in the oil-rich Niger River delta, resulting in a loss of 800,000 barrels a day on the world market. Since Nigerian oil is classified as "light sweet crude," meaning that it requires very little refining, this makes it a particularly painful loss to the American market. Concurrently, in this scenario, a cold wave sweeping across the Northern Hemisphere boosts global demand by 800,000 barrels a day. Because global oil production is already functioning at close to maximum capacity (around 84 million barrels a day), small disruptions in supply shudder through the system very quickly. A net deficit of almost two million barrels a day is a significant shock to the market, and the price of a barrel of oil rapidly goes to more than $80. Read more...

7 comments:

Nilla said...

I first saw the article on Ijebuman's blog last week and all I could say is that the picture they have there is enough to cause fear.....

n9ja said...

Thanks…Gotta say Vanity fair was the last place I would have expected to see such an article. Off to read the full write up.

Cheetarah said...

I actually cut out that article and at some point Sebastian Junger trys to compare Nija to Iraq?, but it seemed to be nija week in the papers, the independent on thurs 18th had an MBA section which featured Shell Nigeria's first female board member Alison Madueke and now the fillipino govt telling its peeps not to go to Nigeria, Lol! Everytime our rep starts
going up some1 kicks its down again. Nice one on ur blog,I'm feelin it.

P.S. Jade Goody isnt rascist just an ignorant fool who willing let her stupidity be celebrated. And why does every1 keep saying shez mixed race so she cant be racist? havent they every met black rascist b4?!!!!!!!!

Confessions of a moody crab said...

Wow!! Very interesting article! Have to say that Vanity Fair is the last place I expected to see such an article.

Abt MEND and the Niger-Delta crisis, I agree that their concerns and issues that they are fighting for are legitimate.

However, the way they are going abt it is totally wrong. It is soo easy to tag an organisation employing such tactics as terrorist esp in this post 9/11 world order. With the way Saro-Wiwa went about fighting the Ijaw cause, I'm sure he is totally disappointed in the way MEND is carrying out their affair

Whatever the reason/cause/value, violence is NEVER the answer.

My Talking Beginnings said...

Why does everyone keep saying that vanity fair was the last place they expected to see an article like that? That! is what vanity fair do. My copy just arrived today so haven't read it but glanced through on the train today and it looked grim....pinch of salt?

Dammie said...

Anytime Nkemakjlhfbafb......That article is so disturbing on many levels, I thought it'd be of interest to you!!

Anonymous said...

Hey guys. I saw this article in Vanity Fair at my workplace and considered using the topic to write an argumentative paper in English class. Do you guys think this will make a good enough topic? And what's the advices in writing the paper? Thanks