Monday, October 23, 2006

Nigeria trawl

I've been doing a trawl through the British newspapers, and there've been a fair number of stories about or concerning Nigeria. In today's Times, Tosin Sulaiman, whom I have the pleasure of knowing, visits the Jobs in Nigeria exhibition:

FOR years governments in Africa have talked optimistically of reversing the brain drain, as thousands of professionals have continued to travel abroad in search of better opportunities than they could find in their homeland. Now, however, there are signs that some of these skilled workers could be making their way back. Read more...
The Duke Onoriode is rather silly talking about going back to Nigeria. He says it's important to use "the skills you’ve gained here to help improve things there." Except he only has a masters; what skills is he taking back? I quibble.

The Daily Telegraph had an article on expats in Nigeria publishing a collection of stories about their experiences in Nigeria. There seems to be a trend among people writing about Nigeria; they all tend to start with the woe-is-Nigeria premise, followed by the unbelievable-but-true-that-Nigerians-don't-eat-their-young continuation of the article. Alex Hannaford's recent piece the Indy is one such example. The expats' tales:

Nigeria. The name conjures up images of violence, corruption and injustice. Fortunately the experiences of a group of expatriates in Nigeria balance that view and are gathered together to form a collection of stories called Nigerian Gems. The book depicts a Nigeria that is far more complex, friendly and rewarding than our preconceptions allow for. Read more...

At a press conference today, some hostages released by Niger Delta militiamen spoke about their ordeal.

There was a rather intriguing story about Russian spies is in Nigeria in yesterday's Sunday Times. It reminds of rumours that the US defense attache at the US emabssy in Abuja has his office in the Nigerian Ministry of Defence. If such rumours were true it would explain why Russians would want to spy on Nigeria. Procurement of British military equipment doesn't help either:

Michael Quinn, 65, one of two Irishmen named in the Nigerian courts as part of an alleged Russian spy ring, runs a company, Marshpearl, which the Nigerian government paid to maintain and upgrade 36 British-made Scorpion attack vehicles in 2001. Read more...
In the Guardian at the weekend, there was an interview with a man who hunts bushmeat smugglers.

And there's an old, Okonji-Iweala family love-in, mother and son.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Really interesting articles that you've listed. I really like the Ngzoi and son article. Even though she's educated, she still has that 'Nigereian Parent' mentality that being a doctor is better than being a writer. The good thing thoough is that, she allowed him to make up his mind on whether he wants to be doctor or not. IF only some parents are like that....

d said...

uzo is a darling. he has a heart of gold.

uchenna said...

I think your're doing and amazing job-keep it up!

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the 'round up' of Nigerian news in the UK.

Re. your quibble with Duke Onoride - I disagree with your quibble. While his views of 'going home to improve things there' may seem simplistic, Duke can still make a contribution to a better Nigeria. You don't think that a Master's degree is enough? Do you expect us all to be Ngozis before we go back? In my view, Duke has selected a great Master's degree and he can go back and work for one of the reformed banks or growing Investment Houses.

It's the principle - put your money (and yourself) where your mouth is. We hope that Duke will choose to invest his hard earned millions on the Nigerian Stock Exchange (which I hear has one of the highest returns in the world) or in Nigerian businesses.

In the meantime, I am thankful for those who want to go back home. If nothing else it sends a message to the world that Nigerians will invest in Nigeria, with their money AND their feet.

TRAE said...

The Duke Onoriode is rather silly talking about going back to Nigeria. He says it's important to use "the skills you’ve gained here to help improve things there." Except he only has a masters, what skills is he taking back. I quibble.

haha, that's a nice way of giving it to the haters. the haters are people who erroneously believe that Nigeria is uninhabitable but had their stinking ass raised here for up to 20 years.